Richard Grant


Richard Grant is an award-winning travel writer who has published his work in Men's Journal, Esquire, and Details, among others.  He was born in Malaysia, grew up in Kuwait and then London, England.  He has a history degree from the University College, London.  For several years, he lived a nomadic life in the American West, supporting himself by writing magazine stories, before choosing Tucson, Arizona, as a base from which to travel further. 
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$15.00
ISBN-13: 9781439154144
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Published: Free Press, 9/2011
NO ONE TRAVELS QUITE LIKE RICHARD GRANT and, really, no one should. In his last book, the adventure classic "God's Middle Finger, "he narrowly escaped death in Mexico's lawless Sierra Madre. Now, Grant has plunged with his trademark recklessness, wit, and curiosity into East Africa. Setting out to make the first descent of an unexplored river in Tanzania, he gets waylaid in Zanzibar by thieves, whores, and a charismatic former golf pro before crossing the Indian Ocean in a rickety cargo boat. And then the real adventure begins. Known to local tribes as "the river of bad spirits," the Malagarasi River is a daunting adversary even with a heavily armed Tanzanian crew as travel companions. Dodging bullets, hippos, and crocodiles, Grant finally emerges in war-torn Burundi, where he befriends some ethnic street gangsters and trails a notorious man-eating crocodile known as Gustave. He concludes his journey by interviewing the dictatorial president of Rwanda and visiting the true source of the Nile. Gripping, illuminating, sometimes harrowing, often hilarious, "Crazy River "is a brilliantly rendered account of a modern-day exploration of Africa, and the unraveling of Grant's peeled, battered mind as he tries to take it all in.

$16.00
ISBN-13: 9781416534402
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Published: Free Press, 3/2008
Twenty miles south of the Arizona-Mexico border, the rugged, beautiful Sierra Madre mountains begin their dramatic ascent. Almost 900 miles long, the range climbs to nearly 11,000 feet and boasts several canyons deeper than the Grand Canyon. The rules of law and society have never taken hold in the Sierra Madre, which is home to bandits, drug smugglers, Mormons, cave-dwelling Tarahumara Indians, opium farmers, cowboys, and other assorted outcasts. Outsiders are not welcome; drugs are the primary source of income; murder is all but a regional pastime. The Mexican army occasionally goes in to burn marijuana and opium crops -- the modern treasure of the Sierra Madre -- but otherwise the government stays away. In its stead are the drug lords, who have made it one of the biggest drug-producing areas in the world.

Fifteen years ago, journalist Richard Grant developed what he calls "an unfortunate fascination" with this lawless place. Locals warned that he would meet his death there, but he didn't believe them -- until his last trip. During his travels Grant visited a folk healer for his insomnia and was prescribed rattlesnake pills, attended bizarre religious rituals, consorted with cocaine-snorting policemen, taught English to Guarijio Indians, and dug for buried treasure. On his last visit, his reckless adventure spiraled into his own personal heart of darkness when cocaine-fueled Mexican hillbillies hunted him through the woods all night, bent on killing him for sport.

With gorgeous detail, fascinating insight, and an undercurrent of dark humor, "God's Middle Finger" brings to vivid life a truly unique and uncharted world.

$16.00
ISBN-13: 9780802141804
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Published: Grove Press, 1/2005
American Nomads traces the history of wandering in the New World, through vividly told stories of frontiersmen, fur trappers, cowboys, Comanche and Apache warriors, all the way back to the first Spanish explorers, like Cabeza de Vaca, who crossed the continent in the sixteenth century. What unites these disparate characters is a stubborn conviction that the only true freedom is to roam across the land.

As an outsider aching for the "balm of motion," Grant uses these lives and his own to examine the myths and realities of the wandering life, and its contradiction with the sedentary American dream.